Blog


Merely Advertising Your Services Is Not Enough to File A Use-Based Application

Intellectual Property

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (Board) granted Playdom Inc.’s petition for cancellation of registration for the mark PLAYDOM for certain entertainment services on the basis that the registration was void because Registrant David Couture had not used the mark in the rendering of the entertainment services prior to filing his Section 1(a) use-based application.


Karen Kalzer

Religious Exemption Upheld

Employment, Religion

The Washington State Supreme Court issued an opinion today in Ockletree v. Franciscan Health Services affirming that exempting religious organizations from the Washington Law Against Discrimination does not violate Washington’s Constitution, which guarantees “absolute freedom” in matters of religion.


The Rules in Washington Medical Malpractice Cases Continue to Shift

Health Care, Litigation

Earlier this morning, a deeply divided Washington Supreme Court issued an opinion that allows defense lawyers in certain cases to speak privately with a medical malpractice plaintiff’s treating physicians. The Court’s decision today in Youngs v. PeaceHealth fundamentally changes the status quo in handling and investigating medical malpractice cases in Washington.


Washington Supreme Court Rules Another Medical Malpractice Reform Law Unconstitutional

Health Care, Litigation

This past week, the Washington Supreme Court ruled that yet another aspect of Washington’s recent medical malpractice reform laws is unconstitutional. In the case of Schroeder v. Weighall, the Court on Thursday ruled that minors who are plaintiffs in medical negligence cases are entitled to “toll” the statute of limitations applicable to their claim (a sort of “time out” from the statute of limitations)


Karen Kalzer

Same Sex Marriage Issues Continue to Play on National Stage

Employment

The United States Supreme Court granted a stay to the State of Utah as to implementing the decision of a federal judge who struck down Utah’s ban on same sex marriage (Herbert v. Kitchen). The granting of the stay means that same sex marriage will remain illegal in Utah as the matter runs up the lower court appeals process.